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Year of Climate Records - VIDEO PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 27 July 2015 06:00

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NOAA), last year was the warmest since 1880. These findings are published in the annual report on the state of the climate, prepared with the participation of hundreds of scientists from 58 countries.

The report analyzes four independent sets of data, but the authors caution that the findings can not be considered final - perhaps 2014 could be the warmest, but without a doubt, it can take second place, besides, this year was a record at the local level to many places on the globe. With a high statistical certainty authors reported that the 15 warmest years on record have been recorded since 1997.

NOAA and NASA, the leading monitor the temperature independently of each other, reported in January that 2014 is likely to have been the warmest on record. Also record the temperature values ​​were the oceans, mean sea level and greenhouse gas emissions. Thus, various indicators show climate change - not only at the level of the air temperature, but since the depths of the oceans and ending with the upper layers of the atmosphere. Significant changes have occurred in the oceans, which absorb about 93% of excess heat, which in turn is trapped by greenhouse gases.

If you disassemble the report on items, then these are the features of 2014 are:

1. Temperature Records

As already mentioned, four independent sets of data showed record levels of temperature for the entire 135-year history of observations. On the map you can see the deviation from the mean values ​​and norms.

2. Record levels of the sea

World mean sea level continues to rise - by 3.2 mm per year for the past 20 years. Global satellite tracking began only in 1993, but the trend is clear and consistent. Rising tides are one of the most devastating aspects of climate change. 8 of the 10 largest cities in the world are located near the coast, 40% of the US population live in coastal areas, where the risk of flooding and erosion continues to grow.

3. The glaciers continue to retreat

Data on more than 30 glaciers show that in 2014 a 31 year gradual loss of glaciers. Consistent retreat of glaciers is one of the clearest signals of global warming. Most alarming rate of melting, which accelerated with the passage of time.

4. More hot days and fewer cold nights

Climate change - it is not only an increase in the average temperature, but new highs. They were close to their record levels last year, and this trend is.

5. Record greenhouse gas emissions

By burning fossil fuels, chelovechesstvo increased concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by more than 40% since the Industrial Revolution. The concentration of carbon dioxide for the first time reached 400 parts per million for the first time in May 2013, which recorded the oldest meteorological station on the volcano Mauna Loa in Hawaii - it works since 1958.

6. The oceans have absorbed an enormous amount of heat

Oceans accumulate and give off heat on a large scale. In the long run, the oceans absorb more heat than the planet's surface, which contributes to rising sea levels, melting glaciers and the extinction of coral reefs and fish populations. In 2015, in the Pacific originated El Niño - its appearance is accompanied by the release of the accumulated heat in the ocean environment, the redistribution of power from the ocean to the atmosphere is so great that there is an infringement of normal circulation of the atmosphere, which leads to climate change worldwide. This El Nino has not yet reached its peak, but, according to some estimates, it already is the most powerful ever recorded for this time of the year and may lead to the fact that in 2015 will be recorded more records.


НАЖМИТЕ ЗДЕСЬ ДЛЯ ПРОСМОТРА ВСЕГО СПИСКА НОВОСТЕЙ О НЕОБЫЧНЫХ ЯВЛЕНИЯХ>>>

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